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The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees to take unpaid, job-protected leave to care for a family member who is a current servicemember or a covered veteran with a serious injury or illness. FMLA leave for this purpose is called “military caregiver leave.”

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) entitles eligible employees to take up to 12 workweeks of unpaid, job-protected leave in a 12-month period for a “qualifying exigency” arising out of the foreign deployment of the employee’s spouse, son, daughter, or parent. FMLA leave for this purpose is called qualifying exigency leave. 

Family Illness Leave is provided for an employee to care for the employee’s child, parent, or spouse when that child, parent, or spouse has a serious health condition.

The Hatch Act, a federal law passed in 1939, limits certain political activities of State and local government employees who work in connection with federally funded programs. ​The law’s purposes are to ensure that federally funded programs are administered in a nonpartisan fashion, to protect employees from political coercion in the workplace, and to ensure that employees are advanced based on merit and not based on political affiliation.

Several G.S. 126 contested cases are still active in the Office of Adminstrative Hearings. This policy applies to only those active cases filed prior to June 25, 2011.

A summary of the NCFlex Benefits offered to employees.

The Compensation of Foreign Service Employees Policy defines a foreign service employee, establishes compensation requirements, benefits, and tax reimbursement requirements.

If a settlement/mediation agreement involves an award of back pay for a specific period of time, the agency/university must submit a PD-14, “Statement of Back Pay/Front Pay” to the OSHR Employee Relations Division.

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